Jazz band plays variety of rhythms at winter concert

by | March 19, 2017 | in Web | No Comments

The distinct rhythms of PHS Jazz Band members in black concert attire reverberated at their annual winter concert on Wednesday Dec. 14 in the Alan Harvey Theatre.

The songs performed by the jazz band were “Autumn Leaves”, “My Funny Valentine” and “September” by Earth Wind and Fire, Director of Band Sara Mellas said.

Mellas, who is a substitute for Jazz Band Teacher Andria Mullan, said she hopes that students feel they have grown as musicians and that for this concert she was going for a number of styles for the band members to be exposed to as much as they can.

As for what they get out of this experience, she said she wants them to grow.

“I want them to be able to understand the music that they are playing at a level that’s deeper than just being able to play the notes and rhythms,” she said, “And I want them to feel proud of themselves for what they’ve done the last few months and have some fun.”

Senior Ryan Padua, whose main instrument is drums and percussion, said he has enjoyed preparation for the concert, and that it is different this year because there is a substitute  and he is also playing trombone and trumpet this year.

“Different is not bad and I think once I got used to it, it was enjoyable and I got to jump to different instruments this time,” he said.music

Mellas said she gets the impression that Jazz band likes multiple pieces and that “September” is one of them because there is singing involved. For Junior Vincent Titterton, who plays trumpet for jazz band, “September” is a likeable song.

“It’s really cool to hear a mix of different instruments. It sounds good when anyone plays by themselves but it [playing as a group] really makes it so much better,” Titterton said.

Mellas said there is another concert this year and Jazz band performs at Yoshi’s during the spring.

“The best part is always looking out into the students and seeing the look of accomplishment and pride on their faces – watching them, [and] seeing them feel proud of themselves,” Mellas said.